Презентация "Andrey Gromyko. A famous Russian diplomat" 9 класс


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Andrey Gromyko

Andrey Gromyko

A famous Russian diplomat

General information

Andrey Gromyko was the Soviet Union’s Minister of Foreign Affairs and top diplomat for almost three decades. In all, he served for 48 years as a diplomatic or government official with the USSR and was regarded as a prodigiously capable negotiator in the Soviet Union as well as in the West. Gromyko played a central role in negotiations with foreign powers spanning from the Second World War up until the beginning of the perestroika era. He served under five separate Soviet Union leaders, from Stalin to Gorbachev.

Education

Andrey Andreevich Gromyko was born on 18 in a Belorussian village called Stariy Gromyki. Gromyko was an active member of the Communist Party in school and in college. He studied in a technical college in the nearby city of Gomel, and then in Borisov, an industrial city in Belarus. After graduation, he continued his education in the Minsk Economic Institute, where he specialized in agricultural economics. He attended college part-time, so that he could teach in a local village school, where he became principal while he was still in his early 20s. Gromyko was offered a place in a post-graduate degree course in Moscow. There, he began to learn English, which he was to master as a diplomat, though he always used a translator to allow him breaks to think during negotiations. His university dissertation was on American agriculture; though he might not have known it at the time, his knowledge of America would allow him to get his foot in the door of the diplomatic corps.

In 1949 Gromyko became the First Deputy Foreign Minister of the Soviet Union. The Foreign Minister at the time was Vyshinsky, a close ally of Stalin and a key organizer of the purges. Vyshinsky, fearing Gromyko might replace him as the top diplomat, stripped him of his First Deputy title in 1952, and made him the Soviet Ambassador to the UK, a lower ranked, yet still prestigious, position. After Stalin’s death in 1953, many of the Communist old guard were denounced and lost their positions when the extent of his repressions and purges became clear

In 1949 Gromyko became the First Deputy Foreign Minister of the Soviet Union. The Foreign Minister at the time was Vyshinsky, a close ally of Stalin and a key organizer of the purges. Vyshinsky, fearing Gromyko might replace him as the top diplomat, stripped him of his First Deputy title in 1952, and made him the Soviet Ambassador to the UK, a lower ranked, yet still prestigious, position. After Stalin’s death in 1953, many of the Communist old guard were denounced and lost their positions when the extent of his repressions and purges became clear

Gromyko became Foreign Minister in 1957, a position he was to hold for almost thirty years, until 1985. The Foreign Minister’s negotiating style was legendary. In the West he was known as “Comrade Nyet,” apparently for his stubborn demeanor and refusal to give concessions. He would wear down his negotiating partners by arguing for hours over the most trivial of details, before tackling the meat of the issue, teasing out small victories, which he would trade for larger concessions later in the negotiations. He had an impressive memory, which allowed him to draw on countless legal and diplomatic arguments, names, dates and facts during discussions. Gromyko later commented on this style: “Better ten years of negotiations than one day of war.”

Gromyko became Foreign Minister in 1957, a position he was to hold for almost thirty years, until 1985. The Foreign Minister’s negotiating style was legendary. In the West he was known as “Comrade Nyet,” apparently for his stubborn demeanor and refusal to give concessions. He would wear down his negotiating partners by arguing for hours over the most trivial of details, before tackling the meat of the issue, teasing out small victories, which he would trade for larger concessions later in the negotiations. He had an impressive memory, which allowed him to draw on countless legal and diplomatic arguments, names, dates and facts during discussions. Gromyko later commented on this style: “Better ten years of negotiations than one day of war.”

7 main «No» by Andrey Gromyko

  • "Нет" экономическим успехам США
  • "Нет" блеску и изяществу
  • "Нет" товарищу Сталину
  • "Нет" вольнодумству
  • "Нет" Джону Кеннеди
  • "Нет" "перестройке“
  • "Нет" унынию
  • "No" to US economic success
  • "No," the brilliance and elegance
  • "No," Comrade Stalin
  • "No," freethinking
  • "No," John Kennedy
  • "No," "restructuring“
  • "No," despondency

Interesting facts

  • Девиз всей дипломатической деятельности Громыко — «Лучше 10 лет переговоров, чем один день войны.
  • По оценке министра иностранных дел РФ Сергея Лаврова, Громыко был «великим дипломатом советской эпохи».
  • The motto of the entire diplomatic activity Gromyko – "Better 10 years of negotiations, than one day of the war."
  •  According to Sergey Lavrov, Russian Foreign Minister, Gromyko was "a great diplomat of the Soviet era."

Decorations and awards

  • Twice Hero of Socialist Labour (1969, 1979)
  • Seven Orders of Lenin (incl 1945)
  • Order of the Red Banner (9 November 1948)
  • Order of the Badge of Honour
  • Lenin Prize (1982)
  • State Prize of the USSR (1984) – for the monograph "The external expansion capital: Past and Present" (1982)
  • Jubilee Medal "In Commemoration of the 100th Anniversary since the Birth of Vladimir Il'ich Lenin"
  • Grand Cross of the Order of the Sun (Peru)
  • Order of the Sun of Freedom (Afghanistan)

The END