Презентация "Phrasal verbs are a really important part of the English language, especially for spoken English"


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Phrasal verbs are a really important part of the English language, especially for spoken English.

In our Phrasal Verbs reference section you can find hundreds of the most commonly used phrasal verbs clearly explained with example sentences and fun quiz questions to test your understanding.

 

  • Phrasal verbs are usually two-word phrases consisting of verb + adverb or verb + preposition. Think of them as you would any other English vocabulary. Study them as you come across them, rather than trying to memorize many at once. Use the list below as a reference guide when you find an expression that you don't recognize. The examples will help you understand the meanings. If you think of each phrasal verb as a separate verb with a specific meaning, you will be able to remember it more easily. Like many other verbs, phrasal verbs often have more than one meaning

  • English phrasal verbs come in many shapes and sizes.  Typically, they're a verb and preposition combination which, when combined, changes the meaning of the main verb into something else.  Most students of English find them difficult because sometimes the idiomatic uses either make no sense at all, or the meaning change is so drastic that even a good guesser has no idea what they mean. 

  • Sometimes we call them two part verbs, three part verbs, or multi-word verbs. 
  • Whatever you call them, you should know some basic truths regarding phrasal verb usage.  First of all, they are often used in a literal sense. That is, the combination of the verb with the preposition leads to a logical understanding. There are times when the meaning is far removed from the original verb and takes on a completely idiomatic usage. 

  • Difficulties sometimes occur when deciding if a verb can be 'separated' from the preposition that forms the phrasal verb. The following examples illustrate the problem.
  • Example: Turn off the TV.
  • Example: Turn the TV off.
  • As seen above, some phrasal verbs can be separated with the object of the verb coming between the main verb and the preposition. It's important to know and remember, however, that some phrasal verbs can NOT be separated, and the verb and preposition must remain together. 

  •  
  • Example: The sewer gave off a horrible smell.
  • NOT: The sewer gave a horrible smell off.
  • Some verbs require that the object comes before the adverb. 
  • Example: They allowed the boy through.
  • NOT: They allowed through the boy.
  • When dealing with transitive verbs and the object is a pronoun, then the pronoun comes before the adverb. 

  •  
  • Example: Turn it on.
  • NOT: Turn on it.
  • If the above seems to be a little too much to take in at one time, then I suggest coming back and doing a page or two at a time. My intentions are to include exercises along with some timely theory lessons to help you solidify your knowledge of phrasal verbs.  For more information regarding prepositions and phrasal verbs, click on the preceding link.

  back away

 move backwards, in fear or dislike

  •  When he saw the dog, he backed away.
  •  
  • back down
  •  withdraw,  concede defeat
  •  Local authorities backed down on their plans to demolish the building.
  •  
  • back up
  • 1) give support or encouragement 2) make a copy of (file, program, etc.)
  •  1) If I tell the boss we've got too much work, will youback me up?  2) It is recommended to back up all files in a secure location.
  •  
  • bank on
  •  base your hopes on someone/something
  •  Don't forget the date. I'm banking on your help.
  •  

  •  

  • beef up
  •  improve, make more substantial
  •  He beefed up his presentation with diagrams and statistics.
  •  
  • black out
  •  faint, lose consciousness
  •  When he fell off the horse he blacked out.
  •  
  • block off
  •  Separate using a barrier.
  •  The area was blocked off during the demonstration.
  •  
  • blow up
  • 1) explode;  2) be destroyed by an explosion
  •  1) The terrorists said the bomb would blow up at 9 o'clock.  2) The car blew up but luckily there was nobody in it.
  •  
  • boil down to
  •  be summarized as
  •  The problem boils down to a lack of money.

  •  
  • boot up
  •  start a computer by loading an   operating system or program.
  •  Just give my a few minutes to boot up the computer.
  •  
  • break away
  •  escape from captivity
  •  A few horses broke away from the paddock.
  •  
  • break down
  • 1) go out of order, cease to function 2) lose control of one's emotions
  •  1) John's car broke down so he had to take the bus.  2) The parents broke down when they heard the bad news.
  •  
  • break into
  •  enter by force
  •  Burglars broke into the house around midnight.
  •  

  • call on/upon sby
  •  formally invite or request
  •  I now call upon the President to address the assembly.
  •  
  • calm down
  •  become more relaxed, less angry or upset
  •  He was angry at first but he eventually calmed down.
  •  
  • carry on
  •  continue
  •  He carried on gardening in spite of the rain.
  •  
  • carry out
  • 1) do something as specified     (a plan, an order, a threat) 2) perform or conduct (test, experiment)
  • 1) The plan was carried out to perfection. 2) Tests are carried out to determine the efficiency of a new drug.
  •  
  • carry over
  •  postpone until later
  •  As regards holidays, can you carry over any days from one year   to the next?

  • deal with
  •  handle, take care of  (problem, situation)
  •  The manager is good at dealing with difficult customers.
  •  
  • die down
  •  calm down, become less strong
  •  When the applause died down, she started to sing.
  •  
  • do without
  •  manage without
  •  The shops are closed so we'll have to do withoutsugar.
  •  
  • drag on
  •  last longer than expected
  •  We expected a short speech but it dragged on and on!
  •  

  • ease off
  •  reduce, become less severe or slow down   (pain, traffic, work)
  •  After Christmas the workload generally eases off.
  •  
  • end in
  •  finish in a certain way; result in
  •  Their marriage ended in divorce.
  •  
  • end up
  •  finally reach a state, place or action
  •  If he continues his misconduct he'll end up in prison.
  •  
  • even out
  • 1) eliminate differences of opinion. 2) become level or regular
  •  1) After a long discussion they managed to even outtheir differences.  2) The road was evened out  to make it safer.

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Подготовила ученица 7 «А» МБОУСОШ№11

Алиева Амина